Stay India

Chennai

Red Lollipop (£7)

This is possibly the only hostel in Chennai as it’s the only one I could find. Chennai isn’t a tourist destination at all, but serves more as an international airport hub for the surrounding tourism in Tamil Nadu. I imagine this hostel popped up as a means to serve backpackers with either very early or late flights who were unable to get onward transport. By Indian standards it’s a very decent hostel, albeit at a slightly high price (Rs600/night). It has a comfortable common room with satellite TV, clean dorms and a communal kitchen. As with most hostels in India it doesn’t include breakfast, but does have free tea, coffee and biscuits. Even the wifi is not bad and the showers had hot water when I used them! I can’t really comment on the location as there is nothing to see in Chennai, but it could be a bit closer to the airport.

Location: 6/10
Cleanliness: 8/10
Facilities: 8/10
Value: 6/10


Kochi

Maritime Hostel (£6)

Kochi is a small town with very little tourism and only a tiny selection of hostels. In fact, I believe this is one of only two. Kochi mostly serves as a transport hub to other areas of interest in Kerala, but it does have a nice old colonial village in Kochi Fort and serves as a starting point for tours of the Kerala Backwaters.
The hostel has a shared balcony upstairs for smokers and a decent common room in the reception area. It has a shared kitchen and includes free breakfast, which is a very good deal for only Rs550 / night. They also have hot water and offer a laundry service, although bizarrely you have to hang your clothes yourself.

Location: 8/10
Cleanliness: 7/10
Facilities: 7/10
Value: 7/10


Goa

Water’s Edge, Margao (£6)

I think this hostel initially began life as a boutique hotel and then added a dorm later because it’s the fanciest hostel I’ve ever stayed at. It has a large fancy reception area, expensive restaurant and beautiful outdoor swimming pool. The hostel dorm is separate from the main building and has a nice common area with satellite TV. The only downside to this epic hostel is the location – it’s in the middle of nowhere! It’s far from the beach and about ten kilometres from the nearest train station and airport. However, if you want to spend some quiet days chilling by the poolside in a fancy hotel without breaking the bank, it’s perfect. The restaurant even serves alcohol.

Location: 2/10
Cleanliness: 9/10
Facilties: 10/10
Value: 8/10

Bunkin’ Hostel Vagator (£1)

This is the cheapest hostel in Goa, and quite possibly India. It has three dorm rooms, the cheapest of which is only Rs99 a night – cheaper than a beer! The other two have more privacy and are Rs150. It doesn’t have any facilities and is incredibly dirty, but the outdoor sitting area is nice and the social vibe is great. They have a few basic breakfast options – tea, sandwiches and omelettes, and if you ask nicely they might let you use the kitchen. As with most of Goa, it’s a party hostel and plays loud music until late most nights – so don’t come if you like to sleep early. The location isn’t great as it’s far from the beach, but it is very close to Hilltop – a popular venue that has parties most weekends. They also have two private rooms for Rs800 a night. Bunkin’ is the perfect place for those on a (very) tight budget.

Location: 5/10
Cleanliness: 1/10
Facilties: 3/10
Value: 9/10

Bunkin Hostel

 

Hideout Anjuna (£11 – private rooms only)

Hideout is one of the quietest and cleanest places in Goa, which is a rare thing – especially considering how affordable it is. It only has private double rooms, but for Rs1000 a night it works out similar to two dorm beds in most hostels. The rooms are fairly basic but include aircon and hot water, which is very good value for the price. The only downside is that it’s in a rather odd location, down a dirt path through an empty field slightly off the main beach road. It’s still only a five-minute walk to the beach, but for a similar price you can get rooms on the beach – however, they won’t be anywhere near as clean or quiet. For older couples or people with small children, Hideout is a perfect escape from the chaos of Anjuna while still being beach-accessible. The rooms would benefit greatly from a kettle, considering there is nowhere nearby to get a morning coffee and the hotel doesn’t do any food service.

Location: 8/10
Cleanliness: 10/10
Facilities: 6/10
Value: 7/10

Hideout

 

Namahstay, Arambol (£6)

Arambol doesn’t have many cheap accommodation options for backpackers, but Namahstay – just off the main road in the centre – fills this gap. It has a decent outdoor communal area, relatively clean rooms, laundry facilities and some basic food available. They also do occasional live music gigs in the outdoor area. It’s very close to the market and shops and a five minute walk from the beach. The nearby German Bakery is a must for breakfast – they do excellent Italian coffee and have an amazing selection of cakes and pastries.

Location: 8/10
Cleanliness: 6/10
Facilities: 6/10
Value: 6/10


Hampi

Mowgli Guesthouse (£10) (mowglihampi.com)

Mowgli is a beautiful riverside resort just off the main road on the “Hippie island” side of Hampi, which has now become the only part of Hampi where accommodation is available due to Unesco clearing the south side of the river to protect the monuments and heritage. Mowgli offers deluxe river view rooms and cottages, a decent restaurant, pool table, scooter hire and of course wifi that only works occasionally. It’s not the cheapest accommodation in India but with the lack of hostels available in Hampi it’s still good value for money.

Location: 9/10
Cleanliness: 7/10
Facilities: 7/10
Value: 8/10

Mowgli Guesthouse

Mumbai

Backpacker Panda Appetite (£8)

This hostel is right next to the international airport, so perfect if you are just arriving or leaving. It has a very nice outdoor communal area upstairs overlooking the street, with fans to keep away the mosquitos and a small communal kitchen. The rooms are very clean and all include en-suite bathrooms and very good security. The location is not ideal for sight-seeing or going out at night so most people here are just passing through, but this makes for a good vibe and a great way for people leaving to pass on useful travel info to those who just arrived. No alcohol is allowed in the hostel but there are two bars across the road.

Location: 6/10
Cleanliness: 9/10
Facilities: 6/10
Value: 6/10

Backpacker Panda Appetite

Travellers Inn, Colaba (£7)

Travellers Inn offers dorm and private rooms and is close to the main Mumbai CST train station and most tourist attractions. The rooms are clean and there is a nice common area to meet other travellers and a kitchen with tea/coffee facilities. The bathrooms are not great but fairly standard for India and the wifi works okay but otherwise ,it doesn’t have much to offer other than somewhere to crash.

Location: 9/10
Cleanliness: 7/10
Facilities: 6/10
Value: 6/10

Travellers Inn
Travellers Inn

Udaipur

Dream Heaven (£12 – private rooms)

For the price, you would not believe the amazing views you can get from this hotel! It is right on the Pichot Lake in Udaipur, overlooking the Royal Palace and an island temple. The rooms are spread over three floors and vary from basic double rooms with shared bathroom and no view to rooftop balcony rooms with TV, air-con and en-suite (£18).

However, even without a view room, you can experience the luxury of the views from the rooftop restaurant which has some luxurious seating and beautiful decor. While the food is not 5-star, the menu is quite extensive and most people will find something they like. They also serve alcohol and have a laundry service. The only downside I would say is that the hotel is very dirty.

Location: 10/10
Cleanliness: 4/10
Facilities: 6/10
Value: 7/10

Dream Heaven Udaipur
Dream Heaven Udaipur

Moustache Hostel (£2)

Moustache hostel is excellent value for money in central Udaipur, overlooking the Pichola lake and walking distance from the palace. It features a rooftop restaurant and chill area which offers yoga every morning, as well as a downstairs common area. The hostel is generally quite clean but the bathrooms lack hot water, are old, and smell of sewerage – a common problem throughout Udaipur. The wifi is good although as is also common in Udaipur the electricity tends to go out for a few hours a day.

Location: 8/10
Cleanliness: 4/10
Facilities: 7/10
Value: 9/10


Jaipur

Hotel Gandharva (£12)

When I stayed at Hotel Gandharva it provided exceptionally good value for money. My only fear is that it was new and the price I got was a special opening rate because I can’t believe they would charge so little for what is essentially a 4-star hotel. Every room is immaculate and decked out with all the modern fittings – aircon, dimmed lighting, wall mounted big screen satellite TV, tea and coffee facilities, hot water rain shower, fresh towels and linen, room service – you name it! The hotel features two high-class restaurants and an outdoor swimming pool with water feature and sunbeds. The location isn’t perfect but it’s a short tuk-tuk ride from most attractions.

Location: 7/10
Cleanliness: 10/10
Facilities: 10/10
Value: 10/10

Hotel Gandharva Jaipur
Hotel Gandharva Jaipur

Joey’s Hostel (£7)

In northern Jaipur towards the Amber Fort and Jal Mahal lake is this very nice hostel with dorms from Rs600 and privates from Rs1250. The dorms are very clean and some of the more expensive private rooms are exceptional – with a large balcony, modern bathroom, aircon, kettle and satellite TV.

The hostel has a very sociable roof terrace, communal area with TV and PlayStation and small restaurant with free breakfast. They also sell beer for only Rs100. It’s a bit far from the main town but very convenient for visiting the Amber Fort and Jal Mahal, and a great place to meet other travellers.

Location: 7/10
Cleanliness: 8/10
Facilities: 8/10
Value: 7/10

Joeys Hostel Jaipur
Joeys Hostel Jaipur
Joeys Hostel Jaipur
Joeys Hostel Jaipur

Agra

Hotel Saniya Palace (£7)

This hotel is very cheap and it’s only real selling point is the excellent view of the Taj Mahal from the rooftop terrace. It’s very basic, the rooms are dirty, water is cold, food is not great and the wifi is almost non-existant. But it is just a five minute walk from the entrance to the Taj Mahal, which is really the only thing to see in Agra so it’s not a bad option just for one night.

Location: 9/10
Cleanliness: 3/10
Facilities: 3/10
Value: 5/10

Bedwieser Hostel (£5)

Bedweiser has some decent, clean dorm rooms and a great roof top terrace with communal area and sattelite TV. It also sells a good selection of beers and food, and has a laundry service. The location to the Taj Mahal could be closer, but it’s still within walking distance (20 mins) or a 5 minute tuk-tuk ride. Also nearby is the Taj Nature Walk, which is a bit run-down but at least a nice respite from the constant noise and traffic. A good place to meet other travellers from all over the world.

Location: 6/10
Cleanliness: 8/10
Facilities: 7/10
Value: 7/10

Cycling India: Kerala

Continued from: Cycling India: Tamil Nadu

Day 8: How high can Munnar be?!

After the madness of yesterdays intense climbing, I passed out early and slept until 8 am – about 10 hours straight!  Then I had a proper big sit down breakfast for once involving some kind of Indian curry and rice rolled into a tube shape that cost about £1, which is a bit over my budget but I felt like spoiling myself.


The hotel owner explained that the “closed road” I took yesterday IS actually closed, but only just before Munnar! Guess I should have listened to it after all, as now I had to backtrack quite far. With this new information and after examining the incredibly complex route out of Munnar to the coast I decided I would get a bus from there to Kochi, otherwise, it’s going to take days and I was already behind schedule.

Bison Valley

Along the way, I realised that I had accidentally taken the key to my hotel room with me, but by that point, I was way down in the valley and there was no way I was cycling back up. Fortunately, they had my number so after about an hour they called asking about it. I offered to post it back but they told me just to leave it at a local shop and they will collect it – they were very nice and understanding about it.

I continued along some really beautiful roads flanking a river for a few kilometres and then the uphills started again. For some reason, the elevation lines on Google Maps are not accurate because it indicated a lot of downhill to Munnar but it was basically uphill all the way.  I stopped about five times for tea or coffee and about twenty times to take photos of the endless beautiful tea plantations, so by the time I got to Munnar it was already 3 pm.

Bus to Kochi

I briefly considered staying the night but it looked pretty dead except for rich French tourists, so I found a local bus that was willing to strap my bike on the roof and take me to Kochi for Rs200 (about £1.20).  The bus trip was quite nice and comfortable – they don’t have closed windows just holes you can lean out of and get a nice cooling breeze. Unfortunately, it did take about 5 hours so I only got to Kochi at 8 pm.  It also dropped me in the ass-end of nowhere miles from Kochi beach so I had to cycle 12km’s on the dark busy roads to a hostel on the beach.

I was hoping to grab a cold beer since it’s been a week since I’ve drunk anything and I’m taking the day off tomorrow, but the only places still open were super expensive hotel bars (Rs250), so I just had a coffee and called it a night. I’ll get a Rs100 beer from the wine shop tomorrow… and then, starting Wednesday, a mad race to Goa to make it for the weekend!

Cycled: 36km

Capture

 

Day 9 – Kochi Killed my Laptop

I didn’t do any cycling today just relaxed around Maritime Hostel with some of the other guests and rested my legs. Kochi has an area called Fort Kochi which is popular with tourists for some reason but in reality, there isn’t much to it. It has a quaint village feel to it which is nice but at the same time expensive compared with the rest of India. I briefly walked around exploring with an English guy looking for somewhere with decent wifi but we couldn’t find anything faster than the hostel, which was very slow.

Maritime Hostel

Strangely, on the return to the hostel, my laptop stopped working. No matter what I tried to do it wouldn’t switch on! Eventually, I decided to let it rest for a few days and went out to look for a bottle store to buy beer. Unfortunately, everything was closed due to some or other holiday, so I got some fried chicken instead to drown my sorrows and then headed back to the hostel. I was planning to meet up that evening with an Indian guy I had met on the road the previous day but he must have been busy as he didn’t end up coming, so I just wandered around the docks and beachfront on my own and bought something called a Mud Coffee, which is like a crazy chocolate ice-cream-milkshake-coffee combination thing. It was pretty awesome, to be honest.

Back at the hostel, I got chatting to an Argentinian girl who was born in Germany but now lives in Isreal. She was travelling to South East Asia, where I had recently been, and had just come from Goa, so we chatted for awhile about various travel related things before I headed off to bed.

 

India Day 10: The Kerala Coastline

I headed off about 8 am after the free hostel breakfast and cycled around the bay because the ferry wouldn’t let me take my bike on it – so that added an unnecessary 20 km’s to my trip. Then I followed some very wet and sandy roads along the beachfront for a while in an area they call the backwaters. At one point the road was literally just a beach!

I stopped for a swim around 11 am as it was already boiling hot and I was covered in sweat – it’s definitely more humid on the coast! The beaches around this area are completely deserted and very beautiful, and I can only guess they aren’t more overrun by hotels and tourists because the area must flood a lot during monsoon season.

I stopped after about 70km for lunch of some samosas and fruit for around Rs30 (33p) and then had to catch a short ferry across a river mouth that cost Rs4 (about 5p). The locals on the ferry were very interested in my bicycle and we chatted about my trip. They all found it very odd that someone would travel by bicycle when motorbikes are so cheap, which certainly feels true after 100 km’s on a loaded bike!

I had another swim about 3 pm at a small beach and then headed inland onto the main motorway so I could cover some ground before sunset. I was planning to stop at a town called Ponanni but it turned out to be really tiny and didn’t have any accommodation, so I had to continue on in the dark for two hours! I was hoping to find a quiet dark spot to camp but there were just buildings and people everywhere!  I kept seeing signs for ‘Hotels’ but when I stopped to ask about rooms it turned out they were just restaurants, not hotels. Apparently, in this part of India, a restaurant is called a ‘hotel’!?

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Finally, at about 8:30 pm I reached a town called Tirur, which looked a bit more like it might have an actual hotel, possibly even with rooms! After looking around for a bit I finally found a dirty backstreet motel near the train station with a room for Rs650 (£7). It was a bit more than I’d usually spend but I didn’t have much choice – I had already cycled 141km and I was exhausted!


I had a quick, cheap dinner at a nearby restaurant, then got some snacks and watched a bit of Netflix before crashing out for the night.


India Day 11: Kannur

I left my rubbish hotel room early and cycled north towards Goa. I stopped a few times for food and drink and to catch another ferry but mostly just pushed on through all day to a town called Kannur, which turned out to be surprisingly big and even a bit touristy. Upon arrival, I found the train station and a nearby hotel which actually had two other travellers in it – the first I’d seen since Kochi.

That evening I walked around exploring the town and looking for beer but didn’t find any. I also priced some phones because I desperately need a new one, and almost bought a Samsung J7 for 10,000 rupees but didn’t have cash at the time. I eventually ended up just getting some snacks and watching more Netflix in the hotel room before sleeping early.

(That time is obviously for a car, not bicycle)

 

India Day 12: To Goa

For some reason, I was in a hurry to get to Goa and felt that cycling these roads would just be more of the same for days, so I went to the train station and found a train that was going to the main Goa station within the hour. I checked in my bike to the parcel carriage and then bought a ticket and got some snacks for the journey.

I only had a normal ticket so was expecting to be crushed into the carriage like before, but when I got on there were quite a few seats empty. I sat in one but within a few minutes somebody told me it was their seat, so I moved to another only to be told the same. I realised I must be in the pre-booked seating carriage, so I went and sat in the passageway against a door, trying to be as out-of-the-way as possible. However, within a few minutes, a conductor came and told me I had to move. He looked at my ticket and explained I was in the wrong carriage and either had to walk right to the back of the train to the crush area, or I could pay about Rs200 extra (about £2.30) and get a seat.  I was initially annoyed to have to pay extra but on reflection, it was way better than standing again the crush area again for 6 hours, and I was actually really lucky some seats were empty as usually the trains are fully booked.

As a result, my journey was quite comfortable and for most of the journey I had an entire sleeper bed to myself (They book some of the sleeper beds out as seats so sometimes there are four people to a bed and sometimes it’s completely empty).  I put in my headphones, ate snacks and stared out the window for most of the journey.

Upon arrival in Goa, I collected my bike and headed off on the 10km ride to the only nearby hostel called River’s Edge. On the way, I saw a bottle store so stopped and bought two big 650ml beers for an amazing Rs150 (less than £2). The hostel was amazing, more like a fancy hotel – with swimming pool and all –  and not even expensive at only Rs600 a night.  The only problem is that it’s far from the main area of Goa, so the next day I would head to the coast.

I sat by the pool and enjoyed my first beer in about 2 weeks, reminiscing on the trip and looking forward to some relaxing time in Goa…

 

Coachella Festival

 

I heard some rumours awhile ago that Guns & Roses were reforming with the original line up for Coachella Festival 2016.  Considering all members were adamant this would never happen, I wasn’t too hopeful, but I bought a ticket on a whim anyway – just in case.  Turns out the rumours were true, but since none of my friends had bought a ticket it looked like I was going to Coachella all on my own!  I managed to get a fairly cheap flight to LA by setting a reminder on Skyscanner and waiting for the price to drop.  I also bought a cheap four-person hotel room booking off somebody else who couldn’t go, and then advertised on the forums and found three other solo travellers to join me in the hotel.

I didn’t have a lot of time off work so could only go for a long weekend – leaving Thursday evening and returning Monday night.  Since car hire is so cheap in the US I decided to hire a Ford Mustang and drive down to the festival in style.  13076778_10156926718455220_4754378645578386155_nUnfortunately my flight was delayed and by the time I got to the rental place all the Mustangs were gone, so they let me take a sexy red Dodge Challenger instead!  Bonus!

I met up with Val, one of the other three hotel guests, at the airport.  He’s from Switzerland and is travelling the world for a year on money he saved while doing military service.  We drove down to Palm Springs together, which took a bit longer than planned since the traffic leaving LA was terrible!  Fortunately once we hit the open highway the Dodge saved us some time – that thing has some power!

13083200_10156936496910220_1404436228544111941_nWe arrived that evening, met up with Keith, one of the other guests, checked in, dropped off the car and then went to get our armbands for the festival.  Just before midnight the final guest, Alex, arrived and then we just crashed for the night so we could be up early.

Day 1 – Friday

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We all drove into town in Alex’s car, got some breakfast and I bought a simcard, which turned out to be a waste of money because the entire festival was serviced by free wifi!  We took forever to find parking as Alex was hoping to park in his friends campsite on the festival grounds, but they wouldn’t let us in so we had to park far away and walk.  There weren’t a lot of good acts early on so we just walked around exploring the various stages and artwork installations.  It really is quite an incredible and well designed festival, with amazing, fully structured bars and restuarants – not just the usual food trucks etc.  There were loads of staff and hardly any queues, except for free water which was a bit chaotic due to the hot, desert climate.  Keith went off to do his own thing and me, Val and Alex met up with Alex’s friends and watched Nic Fanciulli on one of the most amazing stages I’ve ever seen!  It was all made up of 3D blocks with flashing lights and screens on every side playing video, and 3D steel cubes13006623_10156929608745220_7423579270170227478_n that hung from the ceiling and moved up and down.  Pretty mind-blowing.

Then we watched Years and Years, Of monsters and Men and M83 on the main stage, and then Jack U on the second stage.  I was pretty drunk by this point, and I vaguely remembering watching Ellie Goulding for a bit, but don’t remember LCD Soundsystem.  I might have just been in the bar by that point, which was excellently positioned because you could see both the main and second stages from it.  Despite the festival having 5 stages, they’re all very close together, so it’s easy to get from one to the other and not miss out on any acts.

Day 2 – Saturday

Today’s the day!  We didn’t go in quite as early as it’s very hot during midday and most of the best acts only start around 5pm, so me and Val made use of the hotel pool and chilled there under the umbrellas for the morning, drinking beer and swimming.  Then we met Alex and got warmed up by singing Guns ‘n Roses very loudly in the car on the way to the festival.  Unfortunately we missed Run the Jewels, but arrived just in time for Bat for Lashes, who I’ve wanted to see for ages.  After that we saw Halsey, who I hadn’t heard of until then and was awesome!

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Then we watched a bit of CHVRCHES and Disclosure, who were both okay but nothing special, and then Ice Cube came on with the other remaining members of NWA.  That’s something I never expected to see in my life!  I also caught a bit of Zedd, which was very cheesy, and A$AP Rocky – equally cheesy.

By some miracle, Guns ‘n Roses actually came on stage on time!  Probably the first time ever.  Axl had fallen a few weeks before and broken his ankle, so he was in a wheelchair which was quite funny and luckily didn’t affect his singing.  I had mostly come to see Slash and Duff, but to see them all on stage together for the first time in 20 years was pretty incredible.  They were still just as good as ever, Slash was amazing, they played all their best songs and it was all round probably one of the best gigs I’ve ever been to.  I took, like, a thousand pictures and pretty much filmed almost every song!

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Day 3 – Sunday

By this point I had seen pretty much everyone I wanted to, so I didn’t rush to get to the festival early.  I bought some eggs and bacon and made breakfast in the hotel, since the room came with a kitchen and figured we might as well make use of it.  The others went off in the car before me, as I was taking my time, and then I just caught the free coach in later and met them there.  13087872_10156936967900220_3165097216644474783_nSoon after meeting them I discovered the Doo-lab, the most awesome secret dancefloor with pumping techno, water canons and insane aerial performers and dancers.  I stayed there for about 2 hours and lost the others because they wanted to go, but I didn’t mind.  I eventually retreated, soaked, to a bar next door selling craft beer.  Everyone is very friendly, so I quickly started chatting to some people and joined up with their crew.  It was two couples, whose names I don’t remember, but we all got very drunk together in the Absolut Vodka bar and took some funny booth photos together, which you can view here on my Instagram.  I’m very clearly the fifth wheel!

The day before I had matched with a girl on Tinder, so I arranged to meet her by the vodka bar.  We chatted and kissed a bit while watching Sia and Major Lazer, and I tried to convince her to come back to our hotel but she wasn’t having it.  I guess a hotel room being shared by four guys is not the most attractive proposition!  By this point I had lost everyone, so I watched Calvin Harris on my own, which was the last act and was followed by a spectacular fireworks display.  Then I called the others and met up with them near the campsite, where we had a few warm beers from the car and some food, before heading off home.

All in all it was a super cool festival, and I would definitely go again.  Quite expensive and a long way to go for just four days, but totally worth it!

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Croatia: Split, Hvar and Plitvice


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In July 2010 six friends and I decided to go to Croatia for two weeks – exploring Hvar, Split, Plitvice and ending up at a music festival called ‘Stop Making Sense’.


Split

Some of us flew into Split together on Easyjet and met some of the others there. The first night we just had dinner, explored the small town and hung out by the ocean side – drinking and messing around in some old forts and railroad tracks.


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Hvar

In the morning we had to get up fairly early and get a ferry to the island of Hvar where we were camping for the night. The ferry took about 2 hours, during which time we relaxed on the deck tanning and drinking beer. We arrived and took a taxi to the far end of the island where we found our campsite.

One couple had booked a pre-made tent with beds, electrical point and even a fridge. The rest of set up some tents that we had brought with, although I didn’t even have a tent so I just slept in the foyer area of the others pre-made tent.


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That evening we got a taxi to the main Hvar town and had the most amazing seafood, and when I came back from the toilet everyone played a trick on me saying we had ordered shots of some crazy strong Croatian alcohol which I was scared to drink, but it turned out it was just a shot of water!


The following day we went swimming in the nearby bay and explored the island around the campsite. It was strangely very quiet around where we were, with not many people around, which was odd for high season.

Bol and Brac

The town of Bol on the nearby island of Brac was our next destination and found our apartment that we had rented for the night. Then the few of us that had licenses hired some scooters and drove around the island for a bit, before coming back and taking some of the others out on the back of the scooters.


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We chilled on Zlatni Rat beach for a bit before getting another ferry back to the mainland, where we spent the night before hiring a car in the morning and starting the drive up to Plitvice National park.

Plitvice

It was a bit further than I thought and took us most of the morning and past lunch, so, unfortunately, we didn’t have a lot of time to see the park which is huge! We rushed through and took as many photos as we could of the beautiful turquoise waterfalls. It really does look like something out of the garden of Eden!

Festival

Around 6 pm we had to leave and did the short one hour drive to Petrcane where the festival was, and then dropped the hire car off at Zadar airport. We all had booked into the hotel that also served as the site for the festival, except one other couple that had their own small apartment nearby.

I don’t remember exact details of the festival but we had some amazing sunset boat parties with DJ’s like Robodello, and at one point I went swimming at midnight which was freezing but fun.